Whats for Easter Dinner Peeps - NURSING

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Sunday, 8 April 2012

Whats for Easter Dinner Peeps


Do you have pets that are just like your family, we do, and if something happened to them our kids and my husband and I would be devastated. Especially if it was something that might have been preventable. Safety and prevention goes for our animal friends also, they depend on us to be smart and think for them.

So you say what kind of things can my pets get sick or die from:

This great info comes from the Petside website

The following seven holiday products are the most common Easter dangers:
Eggs - Dyed and Plastic
Shiny plastic eggs may look like toys to your pets. If they chew and swallow the plastic, it can cause intestinal problems that may require surgery. Fresh, hard boiled eggs are not dangerous, but eggs spoil quickly. If days later your pet finds and eats an egg that was undiscovered during the Easter hunt, it can make them very sick. Tip: Keep track of the number of eggs hidden and make sure all are accounted for at the end of the hunt.
Easter Grass
Cats are especially attracted to these shiny shreds, and just like tinsel, ingesting this "grass" may be lethal. Pets can not digest it, leading to the threads getting stuck in and damaging their intestines. Tip: A better choice? Try using paper, or even real grass!
Chocolate
Most adults already know how dangerous chocolate is for pets, but it is important children know as well. Make sure to tell your kids that sharing with the family pet could make them very sick. Still, supervision is key. Tip: With chocolate bunnies in every basket, and chocolate eggs hidden around the house, it may be best if your pets are in kept in an "Easter free zone" during the festivities.
Easter Lilies
These flowers and beautiful and festive, but should be avoided at all costs if you share your home with pets. Easter lilies are one of the most poisonous plants for pets, especially to cats. Vomiting, lethargy and loss of appetite are symptoms of lily poisoning. Cats who take a bite of the flower can die from kidney failure in less than two days if left untreated. Tip: Try faux lilies for the same look without the risk.
Candy
Chocolate isn't the only tasty treat dangerous for your pet. Too much sugar can also cause digestive upset. Additionally, the foil wrapping around candies can cause internal damage. The sharp pieces may tear your pet's esophagus or intestines. Tip: Be sure to keep a close eye on your pet and clean up all wrappings immediately.
Easter Toys
Those teeny tiny baby chick toys and bendy bunnies may be good basket stuffers for your kids, but to your pets they look like a good snack. Small toys are a choking hazard and should be kept away from cats and dogs. Be sure baskets are kept off the ground, or that pets are kept in another room while baskets are being unwrapped. Tip: Make sure all toys and parts are too big for your pet to fit in their mouth.
Baby animals
Baby chicks, bunnies and ducks may seem like the perfect Easter basket addition, but think twice! Not only do these cute babies grow up into large, adult animals requiring full-time care, but they often carry Salmonella. This harmful bacteria can be transmitted to your children and other pets. Tip: Stuffed bunnies and chicks make a much better choice as Easter pets!
For more information on keeping your pet safe, check out our full list of Poisonous Household Products and Petside's original video: Household Dangers

Please take care and think about those fur-babies at home! Consider adopting a rescue animal also to save a life.

Hoppy Easter today!!



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